FEEDBACK

Display Shows:

My Language:

TED Theme: How the Mind Works

At a conference about ideas, it’s important to step back and consider the engine that creates them: the human mind. How exactly does the brain -- a three-pound snarl of electrochemically frantic nervous tissue -- create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of ...

At a conference about ideas, it’s important to step back and consider the engine that creates them: the human mind. How exactly does the brain -- a three-pound snarl of electrochemically frantic nervous tissue -- create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of beauty, or the sense of self -- and how reliable is it? Dan Dennett contemplates the mind as an ecosystem in which a new class of entities -- memes -- can compete, coexist, reproduce and flourish, and asks what sorts of nefarious things these entities might be up to. An enthusiastic Dan Gilbert presents his new research on the peculiar, counterintuitive -- and perhaps a smidge deflating -- secret to happiness. And Jeff Hawkins explains why a napkin-sized sheaf of cellular matter, wrinkled into a ball, will fundamentally change the direction of the computer industry.

Show all Visit Show Website http://www.ted.com/themes/view/id/4

Avg. 4.3 with 213 ratings

Recently Aired


  • HD

    Ray Kurzweil: Get ready for hybrid thinking

    Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a ...

    Two hundred million years ago, our mammal ancestors developed a new brain feature: the neocortex. This stamp-sized piece of tissue (wrapped around a brain the size of a walnut) is the key to what humanity has become. Now, futurist Ray Kurzweil suggests, we should get ready for the next big leap in brain power, as we tap into the computing power in the cloud.

    Jun 2, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Wendy Chung: Autism — what we know (and what we don’t know yet)

    In this factual talk, geneticist Wendy Chung shares what we ...

    In this factual talk, geneticist Wendy Chung shares what we know about autism spectrum disorder — for example, that autism has multiple, perhaps interlocking, causes. Looking beyond the worry and concern that can surround a diagnosis, Chung and her team look at what we’ve learned through studies, treatments and careful listening.

    Apr 28, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Daniel Reisel: The neuroscience of restorative justice

    Daniel Reisel studies the brains of criminal psychopaths (and mice). ...

    Daniel Reisel studies the brains of criminal psychopaths (and mice). And he asks a big question: Instead of warehousing these criminals, shouldn’t we be using what we know about the brain to help them rehabilitate? Put another way: If the brain can grow new neural pathways after an injury … could we help the brain re-grow morality?

    Mar 18, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Mary Lou Jepsen: Could future devices read images from our brains?

    As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen ...

    As an expert on cutting-edge digital displays, Mary Lou Jepsen studies how to show our most creative ideas on screens. And as a brain surgery patient herself, she is driven to know more about the neural activity that underlies invention, creativity, thought. She meshes these two passions in a rather mind-blowing talk on two cutting-edge brain studies that might point to a new frontier in understanding how (and what) we think.

    Mar 3, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Siddharthan Chandran: Can the damaged brain repair itself?

    After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the ...

    After a traumatic brain injury, it sometimes happens that the brain can repair itself, building new brain cells to replace damaged ones. But the repair doesn't happen quickly enough to allow recovery from degenerative conditions like motor neuron disease (also known as Lou Gehrig's disease or ALS). Siddharthan Chandran walks through some new techniques using special stem cells that could allow the damaged brain to rebuild faster.

    Feb 24, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Alex Wissner-Gross: A new equation for intelligence

    Is there an equation for intelligence? Yes. It’s F = ...

    Is there an equation for intelligence? Yes. It’s F = T ∇ Sτ. In a fascinating and informative talk, physicist and computer scientist Alex Wissner-Gross explains what in the world that means. (Filmed at TEDxBeaconStreet.)

    Feb 6, 2014 Read more
  • HD

    Peter Doolittle: How your "working memory" makes sense of the world

    "Life comes at us very quickly, and what we need ...

    "Life comes at us very quickly, and what we need to do is take that amorphous flow of experience and somehow extract meaning from it." In this funny, enlightening talk, educational psychologist Peter Doolittle details the importance -- and limitations -- of your "working memory," that part of the brain that allows us to make sense of what's happening right now.

    Nov 22, 2013 Read more
  • HD

    Kevin Breel: Confessions of a depressed comic

    Kevin Breel didn't look like a depressed kid: team captain, ...

    Kevin Breel didn't look like a depressed kid: team captain, at every party, funny and confident. But he tells the story of the night he realized that -- to save his own life -- he needed to say four simple words.

    Sep 27, 2013 Read more
  • HD

    James Flynn: Why our IQ levels are higher than our grandparents'

    It's called the "Flynn effect" -- the fact that each ...

    It's called the "Flynn effect" -- the fact that each generation scores higher on an IQ test than the generation before it. Are we actually getting smarter, or just thinking differently? In this fast-paced spin through the cognitive history of the 20th century, moral philosopher James Flynn suggests that changes in the way we think have had surprising (and not always positive) consequences.

    Sep 26, 2013 Read more
  • HD

    Elizabeth Loftus: How reliable is your memory?

    Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false ...

    Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false memories, when people either remember things that didn't happen or remember them differently from the way they really were. It's more common than you might think, and Loftus shares some startling stories and statistics -- and raises some important ethical questions.

    Sep 23, 2013 Read more
Loading...