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Quadriga: The International Talk Show

DW-TV´s international talk show with four journalists discussing the week´s top international issue.

Visit Show Website http://www.dw-world.de/dw/0,,729...

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  • HD

    Quadriga: War in Syria - no peace without Putin?

    The war in Syria has claimed the lives of a ...

    The war in Syria has claimed the lives of a quarter of a million people. Millions have been displaced. They are fleeing IS terror. But mostly missile and bomb attacks by Assad's government forces. Russian President Vladimir Putin is now upping its military support for Assad. Putin is keen to promote himself in the West as an indispensable partner in the fight against terror. What are Putin's real motives in Syria? Does the West have no choice but to work with him if Syria is to have any chance of peace. War in Syria - no peace without Putin? Have your say: Quadriga[at]dw.com Our guests: Alan Posener is a political commentator at Die Welt. Mr Posener says: “Putin supports Assad and Teheran, two regimes that are much more dangerous than the Islamic State. Putin is part of the problem, not the solution.” Ivan Rodionov is the head of the Berlin office of the Russian state funded video agency Ruptly. He has reported from areas of conflict such as Chechnya, Afghanistan and the Middle East. Mr Rodionov says: "Yet another regime change operation as the ultimate western Syria strategy has failed miserably. Time to face the facts and deal with the consequences." Ines Pohl until recently, she was the editor-in-chief of the Berliner daily die tageszeitung or taz. She is now preparing to go to Washington as a correspondent for DW. Ines Pohl believes:"The West has let a murderous Assad rampage for so long that now there's no solution without Putin."

    Sep 24, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Refugee crisis - did Merkel get it wrong?

    Germany has welcomed thousands fleeing conflict and repression with open ...

    Germany has welcomed thousands fleeing conflict and repression with open arms. Chancellor Angela Merkel was a leading voice in offering them safe haven. But her government has now reintroduced border controls. Other European countries have followed Germany's example and also closed their borders. Why the sudden u-turn? Did Chancellor Merkel get it wrong? Have your say: quadriga(at)dw.com Mekonnen Mesghena is an expert for migration and diversity at the Heinrich Böll Foundation in Berlin. He says: "Merkel may not have a plan, but she has shown humanity and leadership" Andreas Kluth is the Berlin bureau chief of The Economist. He believes: "There is a real risk that Europe could fail at the biggest humanitarian challenge it has ever faced. If it betrays its values in this way, Europeans will turn away from the EU." Burkhard Birke is a correspondent for the German radio broadcaster Deutschland Radio. He has reported in the past from Washington, Brüssels, London and Paris. He says: "For the first time, Merkel has a clear position: Border controls are a means of forcing other EU countries to show solidarity."

    Sep 17, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: African exodus - who is to blame?

    Millions of people are on the move in Africa, fleeing ...

    Millions of people are on the move in Africa, fleeing poverty and violence. They are willing to pay large sums of money and even risk their lives and in the hope of making it to Europe, America, or anywhere else that promises safety and the prospect of a better future. The countries of Africa are losing a whole generation of young people. The question is: Who is to blame for the Exodus? Have your say: quadriga(at)dw.com Our guests: Usman Shehu -is a journalist from Nigeria who works on Deutsche Welle's Africa Desk in Bonn. He says: "Many people in Africa refuse to pay tax - they need to change their negative attitude toward the State." Veye Tatah - was born in Cameroon but has lived in Germany for many years. She's an entrepreneur and the editor-in-chief of Africa Positive magazine. She says: “Many policies of the West and bad governments in some African countries contribute to the exodus of the African youth.” Richard Khamis - is a journalist from South Sudan who came to Germany to study. After graduating, he worked for German broadcaster Mitteldeutscher Rundfunk and then for a United Nations media project in his home country. He says: "Many African migrants are young and well educated - the exodus will do lasting damage to the economies of Africa."

    Sep 10, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Germany and the migrants: Hate or help?

    Arson attacks on refugee shelters, neo-Nazi riots, right wing extremists ...

    Arson attacks on refugee shelters, neo-Nazi riots, right wing extremists spreading fear and whole families who turn out to applaud anti-foreigner protests. What are politicians doing to counter this? Chancellor Angela Merkel has finally taken charge and made clear statements condemning the agitators and praising those who extend a helping hand. Prosperous Germany is seen as a land of hope and opportunity. Where has this anger and violence against those seeking refuge come from? Has this xenophobia been bubbling under the surface for some time? Germany and the migrants: Hate or help? What do you think? Write to us: quadriga[at]dw.com Our guests: Stefan Buchen - studied Arabic Language and Literature, reports regularly from country in the Middle East and Northern Africa and works as a journalist for the political magazine show "Panorama" on German public broadcaster ARD. He says: “There's a nebulous majority that falls somewhere in between hate and help. What do they think?" Alan Posener - is a German-British author and a political commentator for the daily newspaper Die Welt. He says: "Right-wing extremists don't have any solutions. They just whip up animosity toward the government." Ursula Weidenfeld - is of one most well-respected German business journalists. She says: "Most Germans are neither racist nor xenophobic. They can't allow extremists to set the tone."

    Sep 3, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Refugee crisis - Do we care enough?

    Hundreds of thousands are fleeing persecution, war and poverty – ...

    Hundreds of thousands are fleeing persecution, war and poverty – in the hope of safety and a better life in Europe. In Germany alone an estimated 800.000 refugees are expected to arrive this year. Many Germans are eager to help them, but there has also been opposition and even racist attacks. Can Europe find a worthy answer to the migrant crisis? Or will we respond by isolating ourselves further? What’s your opinion, have your say: quadriga(at)dw.com Our guests: Christoph von Marschall is the diplomatic correspondent for the Berlin daily Der Tagesspiegel. In his opinion, there are desirable and undesirable asylum seekers: “People from the Balkans,” he says, “have no right to asylum and they don’t have the kind of professional skills that Germany needs. They should therefore be deported.” Katarzyna Stoklosa is an expert on central and eastern Europe. She has studied or taught at universities in Poland, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia and Denmark. Katarzyna is currently an associate professor in the Department of Border Region Studies at the University of Southern Denmark. She says: "Germany has to offer migrants a real integration program. That would help the newcomers, and allow German society to profit from what they have to offer.“ Erik Kirschbaum was born in New York. He is a reporter who has down the years written for numerous dailies and magazines in the US. He currently works for the Reuters news agency here in Berlin. And he says: “Beyond the ugly headlines, Germans have been opening their hearts and homes for refugees.”

    Aug 20, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: The Merkel System - no end in sight?

    Angela Merkel has headed the German government for 10 years ...

    Angela Merkel has headed the German government for 10 years now. Yet there’s still no likely successor to the throne. German voters can’t seem to get enough of her. Merkel’s popularity in opinion polls is almost unbroken. As the leader of Europe’s economic powerhouse she has also taken the lead in international issues, playing a decisive part in negotiations over the Greek debt crisis, for example. What is Merkel’s recipe for success? And is such a long time in office good for Germany and for Europe? What do you think? Have your say: quadriga(at)dw.com Margaret Heckel - is the author of the best-selling book "How Merkel Rules". Now a freelancer, she served as head of the politics desk at several German newspapers, including Die Welt and Financial Times Deutschland. Margaret Heckel says "Merkel stands for stability, that's why the Germans trust her." Ines Pohl - until recently, she was the editor-in-chief of the Berliner daily die tageszeitung or taz. She is now preparing to go to Washington as a correspondent for DW. Ines Pohl says: It is no longer enough to just manage crises, the way Merkel does." Alexander Görlach - is the founder, publisher and editor-in-chief of the German debate magazine The European. Previously, Görlach worked for a variety of German media. He is convinced: "If Merkel manages to build up a successor, she will go down in history as the greatest German chancellor ever."

    Aug 13, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Turkey - Erdogan's Double Game

    Since July 24 Turkish jets have been carrying out regular ...

    Since July 24 Turkish jets have been carrying out regular airstrikes in Syria and northern Iraq. One target is Islamic State terrorist militias. But it is now mainly the positions of the Kurdish PKK that are being targeted. The PKK has responded with attacks in Turkey. The fragile Turkey-PKK ceasefire is well and truly over. The peace process that President Tayyip Erdogan supported is on the rocks. In recent parliamentary elections in Turkey Erdogan's Justice and Development party AKP was denied an overall majority by the unexpected success of the pro-Kurdish HDP party. A government coalition has yet to be formed. So is Erdogan justified in his tough response to PKK terrorism? Or is he on an escalation course designed to weaken and discredit political opponents ahead of new elections? What do you think? Have your say. Drop us a line: quadriga(at)dw.com Alan Posener - is an author and political commentator for the Berlin daily Die Welt. He says: "Turkey has the right to pursue Kurdish terrorists." Ines Pohl is currently preparing to take on responsibilities as Deutsche Welle's Washington correspondent. For several years, she was the Editor-in-Chief at the Berlin daily taz. She says: "The West need the Kurds as an ally." Değer Akal is a Berlin-based freelance journalist. From year 1999 until 2007 she worked in Turkey’s capital Ankara as diplomatic correspondent for various newspapers and TV channels. She is currently covering numerous topics related to Turkish foreign policy including its relations with Germany. She says: "Turkey has to return to the peace process."

    Aug 6, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Refugees - Welcome in Germany?

    Fleeing hardship, war and oppression, more and more refugees are ...

    Fleeing hardship, war and oppression, more and more refugees are making their way to Germany. Over 400 thousand are expected to arrive this year alone. Many are escaping war, terror and persecution in Africa and the Middle East. Others come from Asia and South East Europe hoping to leave behind poverty and bleak economic prospects. Most Germans still express support and solidarity for taking in refugees, but there’s a growing debate about the numbers. Some politicians say Germany is reaching its limits and has done more than its fair share. Even Chancellor Angela Merkel says Germany "just can't manage" to take them all. More deportations, or more residency permits? Refugees - how welcome are they really in Germany? What do you think? Have your say. Drop us a line: quadriga(at)dw.com Our guests: Christian Jakob - is an editor of the German newspaper taz and Co-author of a book on European migration politics with the name of ”Europe sealed tight.'' He says "The next weeks will show, if Germany has learned from the anti-immigrant pogroms of the early nineties." Alan Posener - is an author and political commentator for the Berlin daily Die Welt. He says: “People who seek political asylum for legitimate reasons should get it. People who seek to exploit the asylum system for personal gain should get it in the neck. [should be deported]” Marvin Oppong - writes for a variety of German media. He also published a book on migrants in German politics. He says: “The German government does not adequately protect asylum seekers and is not strong enough on racism.”

    Jul 30, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Iran deal - all about business?

    The Iran Nuclear deal is just a few days' old. ...

    The Iran Nuclear deal is just a few days' old. And German economics minister Sigmar Gabriell is already in Teheran, discussing business prospects with the regime. The declared aim of the nuclear talks was to prevent Iran getting the bomb and to make the Middle East safer. But did the West have an ulterior motive? Is the deal with Iran all about business? Have your say: quadriga(at)dw.com Our guests: Adnan Tabatabai - is a Berlin-based political analyst on Iranian affairs. His opinion on the Iran deal: “Diplomacy works: the Nuclear Agreement is a blueprint for conflict resolution in the Middle East.” Alan Posener - is an author and political commentator for the Berlin daily Die Welt. He thinks: “The mullahs are the problem, not the bomb. They exploited our weakness to get a deal that benefits them without giving us anything in return.” Ursula Weidenfeld – is a well known Business journalist. She says: “Iran is not a friend. Iran remains dangerous. But it is better to try a deal than to risk a war.”

    Jul 23, 2015 Read more
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    Quadriga: Greek deal – New start for Europe?

    The marathon Eurozone leaders' summit that ended Monday morning after ...

    The marathon Eurozone leaders' summit that ended Monday morning after fifteen hours of tough negotiating has paved the way for a new Greek debt deal. The dreaded Grexit, a Greek exit from the Euro zone, has been avoided. But Greece is having to pay a high price in the form of even harsher conditions for a new bail-out. Greece is required to quasi relinquish aspects of sovereignty in some key areas. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says he was forced into a bad deal. With the new deal done is it time for a fundamental reform of the Eurozone? Or has the Euro project been irreparably damaged by the months of bitter wrangling? Have your say: quadriga[at]dw.com Our guests: Faye Karaviti - is the Berlin Correspondent for the Athens News Agency, Real News Media Group and Greece’s Alpha TV. She says: "The Greek case has proven that Europe can achieve compromises but is not yet mature enough for self-criticism." Alan Posener - German-British author and commentator for the daily newspaper DIE WELT. He says: “A new start in Europe would mean scrapping the Euro. Unfortunately, Europe's elites have become addicted to it.” Ursula Weidenfeld - is one of Germany's best-known economics journalists; she has served in senior editorial positions for many leading business publications. She says: "Greek Rescue means muddling along at any cost.“

    Jul 16, 2015 Read more
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