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TED Theme: How the Mind Works

At a conference about ideas, it’s important to step back and consider the engine that creates them: the human mind. How exactly does the brain -- a three-pound snarl of electrochemically frantic nervous tissue -- create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of ...

At a conference about ideas, it’s important to step back and consider the engine that creates them: the human mind. How exactly does the brain -- a three-pound snarl of electrochemically frantic nervous tissue -- create inspired inventions, the feeling of hunger, the experience of beauty, or the sense of self -- and how reliable is it? Dan Dennett contemplates the mind as an ecosystem in which a new class of entities -- memes -- can compete, coexist, reproduce and flourish, and asks what sorts of nefarious things these entities might be up to. An enthusiastic Dan Gilbert presents his new research on the peculiar, counterintuitive -- and perhaps a smidge deflating -- secret to happiness. And Jeff Hawkins explains why a napkin-sized sheaf of cellular matter, wrinkled into a ball, will fundamentally change the direction of the computer industry.

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    How your "working memory" makes sense of the world | Peter Doolittle

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    Confessions of a depressed comic | Kevin Breel

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    Why our IQ levels are higher than our grandparents' | James Flynn

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    How reliable is your memory? | Elizabeth Loftus

    Psychologist Elizabeth Loftus studies memories. More precisely, she studies false ...

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    The art of misdirection | Apollo Robbins

    Hailed as the greatest pickpocket in the world, Apollo Robbins ...

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    Stress. It makes your heart pound, your breathing quicken and ...

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    The voices in my head | Eleanor Longden

    To all appearances, Eleanor Longden was just like every other ...

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    Aug 8, 2013 Read more
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    What's a proven way to lower your energy costs? Would ...

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    Today, thanks to better early detection, there are 63% fewer deaths from heart disease than there were just a few decades ago. Thomas Insel, the director of the National Institute of Mental Health, wonders: Could we do the same for depression and schizophrenia? The first step in this new avenue of research, he says, is a crucial reframing: for us to stop thinking about "mental disorders" and start understanding them as "brain disorders."

    Apr 16, 2013 Read more
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