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Insidermedicine Daily News (Video)

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured ...

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured by Google News and The News Room. April 25, 2007 Patients with HIV who are treated with protease inhibitors have an increased risk of heart attack, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Combination antiretroviral therapy has had a dramatic effect in reducing illness and death associated with the HIV virus, however an earlier study showed that the risk of heart attacks increased by 17% with every year a patient spent on antiretroviral. It isn’t known, though, whether all antiretroviral drugs carry this risk. The assessment of the role of any specific drug is difficult because patients with HIV usually receive a combination of drugs, and often switch regimens because of the availability of newer substances, adverse events, or drug regimen failure. Previous studies have shown a relationship between the use of protease inhibitors, a class of antiretroviral drug, and cardiovascular disease, but there is little information on the risks associated with another class of antiretroviral therapy called nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. In this study, more than 23,000 patients infected with the HIV virus were assessed to determine the incidence of heart attack and the association between heart attack and exposure to protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. Confirming the earlier results, the researchers found the risk of having a heart attack increased by 16% per year of exposure to protease inhibitors alone, which is equal to twice the risk over five years. Not such effect was observed with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. It is thought that protease inhibitors raise the level of blood lipid, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attack. Patients treated with protease inhibitors should have their cholesterol and blood pressure levels monitored, and take steps to reduce their lifestyle-related risk factors. This includes maintaining a healthy weight, eating a low-fat diet rich in fruits in vegetables, and getting regular exercise. Reporting for Insidermedicine, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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    An hour of exercise a day lowers risk of heart failure

    (September 4, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Sweden - An hour ...

    (September 4, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Sweden - An hour of exercise a day may help lower risk of heart failure, according to a report published in Circulation: Heart Failure. Researchers studied nearly 40,000 individuals between 20 and 90 years of age. None of the participants had heart failure at the study outset and were followed since 1997. Results showed that those with over an hour of moderate exercise a day, or half an hour of vigorous physical activity a day, were at 46% reduced risk of heart failure.

    Sep 4, 2014 Read more
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    Big increase in amount of double mastectomies being performed

    (September 3, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From California - A new ...

    (September 3, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From California - A new report published in JAMA finds an increase in the amount of double mastectomies being performed. Researchers studied data from the California Cancer Registry, examining nearly 200,000 breast cancer cases over 13 years. They found that rates of double mastectomy rose from 2% in 1998 to 12.3% in 2011--a 14.3% yearly increases.

    Sep 3, 2014 Read more
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    Coffee may raise risk of prediabetes in some young adults

    (September 3, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Italy - Coffee may ...

    (September 3, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Italy - Coffee may raise risk of prediabetes in certain young adults, according to a report presented at the annual ESC Congress. Researchers studied over 1,100 individuals, aged 18-45, all of whom had stage 1 hypertension but no diabetes. Researchers then analyzed which participants were fast or slow metabolizers of caffeine, and followed participants for 6.1 years. Results showed that moderate coffee drinkers were at 24% increased risk of prediabetes, while those who drank none at all or over 3 cups a day were at 2x increased risk. Interestingly, this risk was only increased when an individual was a slow caffeine metaboliser.

    Sep 3, 2014 Read more
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    Risk of acute coronary syndrome following retinal artery occlusion

    (September 2, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Taiwan - A new ...

    (September 2, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Taiwan - A new report published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology examines the risk of acute coronary syndrome following retinal artery occlusion. Researchers compared over 600 RAO patients to over 4,000 matched controls. Researchers then assessed the incidence and risk of acute coronary syndrome for both groups. Results showed that RAO greatly increased the risk of acute coronary syndrome.

    Sep 2, 2014 Read more
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    Better health care as important to heart health as avoiding unhealty lifestyle

    (September 2, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Hamilton - Better health ...

    (September 2, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Hamilton - Better health care is just as important as avoiding risk factors for heart health, according to a report published in the NEJM. Researchers studied over 150,000 people from 17 countries. They found that low income countries with the lowest risk factors for cardiovascular problems were actually at the highest risk of of heart attack and stroke and death, while high-income countries with the most risk factors for these issues were at the lowest risk of cardiovascular events and death. Researchers believe this proves that health care is just as important as lifestyle habits in maintaining heart health.

    Sep 2, 2014 Read more
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    Diet high in salt worsens multiple sclerosis symptoms

    (September 1, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Argentina - According to ...

    (September 1, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Argentina - According to research published in the BMJ, a diet high in salt may make multiple sclerosis symptoms worse. Researchers studied 70 multiple sclerosis patients, checking participant's blood and ruing levels for levels of salt. Participants were then followed for two years. Result showed that, after taking into account risk factors, those whose dietary intake of salt was high were 3.5x more likely to demonstrate signs of further disease progression.

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    Cognitive impairment linked to risk of stroke

    (August 28, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From South Carolina - Cognitive ...

    (August 28, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From South Carolina - Cognitive impairment raises risk of stroke, according to a report published in CMAJ. Researchers conducted a meta-analysis comprised of 18 studies and over 120,000 individuals. Of these, there were nearly 8,000 strokes. Results showed that individuals with cognitive impairment at baseline were at 39% increased risk of stroke, when compared to those with normal cognitive functioning at baseline.

    Aug 28, 2014 Read more
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    Changes in retina may predict changes in brain

    (August 27, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From California - Changes in ...

    (August 27, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From California - Changes in the retina may predict changes in the brain, according to a report published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. Researchers studied a group of patients with a genetic mutation that causes frontotemporal dementia. Researchers found that these individuals demonstrated significant retinal thinning, thinning that was not present in people without the mutation, prior to any signs of the dementia occurring.

    Aug 27, 2014 Read more
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    Aspirin lowers risk of blood clot, deep vein thrombosis

    (August 26, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Australia - A new ...

    (August 26, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Australia - A new report published in Circulation finds that aspirin greatly reduces risk of clots and deep vein thrombosis. Researchers studied a group of patients, randomizing participants to either 100mg daily aspirin or placebo. Results showed that those taking the aspirin had a 33% reduced risk of thromboembolism, DVT, pulmonary embolism and heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death.

    Aug 26, 2014 Read more
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    Type 2 diabetics can greatly lower health care costs with lifestyle changes

    (August 25, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From North Carolina - A ...

    (August 25, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From North Carolina - A new report published in Diabetes Care finds that type 2 diabetics lower their health care costs by losing weight. Researchers studied over 5,000 individuals with type 2 diabetes. Participants were obese or overweight, between 45 and 76 years old, and were followed for 10 years after being randomized to either intensive lifestyle intervention or diabetes support and education. Results showed that those who underwent lifestyle intervention--improving their diet and increasing physical activity--lowered their annual health care costs by over $500.

    Aug 25, 2014 Read more
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