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Insidermedicine Daily News (Video)

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured ...

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured by Google News and The News Room. April 25, 2007 Patients with HIV who are treated with protease inhibitors have an increased risk of heart attack, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Combination antiretroviral therapy has had a dramatic effect in reducing illness and death associated with the HIV virus, however an earlier study showed that the risk of heart attacks increased by 17% with every year a patient spent on antiretroviral. It isn’t known, though, whether all antiretroviral drugs carry this risk. The assessment of the role of any specific drug is difficult because patients with HIV usually receive a combination of drugs, and often switch regimens because of the availability of newer substances, adverse events, or drug regimen failure. Previous studies have shown a relationship between the use of protease inhibitors, a class of antiretroviral drug, and cardiovascular disease, but there is little information on the risks associated with another class of antiretroviral therapy called nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. In this study, more than 23,000 patients infected with the HIV virus were assessed to determine the incidence of heart attack and the association between heart attack and exposure to protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. Confirming the earlier results, the researchers found the risk of having a heart attack increased by 16% per year of exposure to protease inhibitors alone, which is equal to twice the risk over five years. Not such effect was observed with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. It is thought that protease inhibitors raise the level of blood lipid, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attack. Patients treated with protease inhibitors should have their cholesterol and blood pressure levels monitored, and take steps to reduce their lifestyle-related risk factors. This includes maintaining a healthy weight, eating a low-fat diet rich in fruits in vegetables, and getting regular exercise. Reporting for Insidermedicine, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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    Pesticide exposure linked to heart disease

    (April 8, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Portugal - Pesticide exposure ...

    (April 8, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Portugal - Pesticide exposure may raise risk of heart disease, according to a report published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Researchers studied fat tissue and blood samples from over 120 obese women who had undergone bariatric surgery. Researchers then used the Framingham risk score to assess participant's 10-year risk of heart disease. They found that those who had higher concentrations of environment estrogens such as DDT were also more likely to have elevated inflammation and a greater risk of heart disease

    Apr 8, 2015 Read more
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    Different types of BRCA 1 and 2 mutations affect risk of breast and ovarian cancer

    (April 8, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Philadelphia - A new ...

    (April 8, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Philadelphia - A new report published in JAMA finds that risk of breast or ovarian cancer may be different depending on the type of BRCA 1/2 mutation. Researchers studied over 31,000 women, nearly 20,000 who carried BRCA1 mutations and nearly 12,000 who carried BRCA2 mutations. They found that risk of either breast or ovarian cancer varied by the type and location of the mutations.

    Apr 8, 2015 Read more
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    Exposure to domestic dysfunction raises asthma risk

    (April 7, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Massachusetts - Exposure to ...

    (April 7, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Massachusetts - Exposure to domestic dysfunction raises risk of asthma, according to a report published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Researchers studied interviews with parents of over 90,000 children between the ages of 0-17 years, assessing the child's exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACE) such as drug problems or domestic violence. Results showed that those exposed to just one ACE were at 28% increased risk of asthma compared to those with no history of the events.

    Apr 7, 2015 Read more
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    Every hour spent watching TV raises risk of diabetes

    (April 6, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Pittsburgh - A new ...

    (April 6, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Pittsburgh - A new report published in Diabetologia finds that every hour spent watching television raises risk of diabetes. Researchers studied over 3,200 overweight US adults who were at least 25 years of age. Participants were put in either an intervention or control group; the intervention group consisted of increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time. They found the intervention group had the greatest reduction in mean time spent watching TV and sitting, compared to the control groups on placebo, or metformin. They also found that, among all treatment groups, every hour spent watching TV raised risk of diabetes by 3.4%.

    Apr 6, 2015 Read more
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    Childhood cancer survivors on the rise, most have chronic health conditions

    (April 2, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Chicago - Childhood cancer ...

    (April 2, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Chicago - Childhood cancer survivors are on the rise, and most have chronic health conditions, according to research published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. Researchers studied cancer survival data from two US registries, examining data on 14,000 long term cancer survivors. Based on this data, researchers estimate that cancer survivors have increased by nearly 60,000 since 2005 and that 84% survived five or more years following diagnosis. They also estimate that around 70% of these survivors also have a mild or moderate chronic condition, and that one third of cancer survivors suffer from severe, disabling or life-threatening chronic condition.

    Apr 2, 2015 Read more
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    BPA exposure during pregnancy may raise risk of diabetes in the mother

    (April 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Spain - Exposure to ...

    (April 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Spain - Exposure to BPA during pregnancy raises a mother's future risk of diabetes, according to a report published in Endocrinology. Researchers studied three groups of pregnant mice--one exposed to low BPA levels early in pregnancy, one exposed to higher levels during the same time period, and one that wasn't exposed at all. Researchers then tested to rodent's glucose tolerance. They found, at four months after birth, the BPA-exposed mice began to demonstrate impaired glucose tolerance. At seven months postpartum, the BPA-exposed rodent's beta cells--cells responsible for creating insulin--started to decrease significantly when compared to the control rodents.

    Apr 1, 2015 Read more
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    Potential blood test assesses severity of peanut, shellfish allergy

    (April 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From New York - A ...

    (April 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From New York - A new report published in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology finds a novel blood test that may predict severity of food allergies. Researchers collected blood samples from nearly 70 patients between 12 and 45 years old. Participants then underwent a food challenge test with a placebo or with peanut, tree nut, shellfish, fish or sesame, and researchers compared the results of their blood test to those of the food challenge. Results showed a strong correlation between the blood test data and the results of the food challenge test.

    Apr 1, 2015 Read more
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    PTSD may heighten risk of heart failure

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Ohio - A new ...

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Ohio - A new study appearing in the American Journal of Public Health, finds that PTSD may increase the risk of developing heart failure. Following over 8,000 US veterans for an average of 7 years, researchers found that those participants who were diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder had nearly a 50% increase risk of heart failure. Those veterans who had been in combat were also approximately  5 times more likely to develop heart failure.

    Mar 31, 2015 Read more
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    Higher fitness in midlife may lower risk of cancer in men

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Vermont - For men, ...

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From Vermont - For men, higher fitness in midlife, may reduce the odds of cancer later in life, according to a report in JAMA Oncology. Cardiorespiratory fitness for nearly 14,000 men were assessed between 1971 and 2009 with a treadmill test. As they entered into the medicare system, their incidence of prostate, colorectal, and lung cancer was tracked. The researchers found that a high fitness level in midlife was associated with a 55% lower risk of lung cancer, and a 44% lower risk of colorectal cancer, with no change in the risk of prostate cancer diagnoses. A higher fitness level was also associated with a 32% lower risk of death from these cancers, and a 68% reduced risk of cardiovascular death.

    Mar 31, 2015 Read more
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    Total hip replacements among middle aged adults increasing

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From New York - According ...

    (March 31, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From New York - According to a new report, the number of total hip replacement surgeries among middle aged adults has greatly increased. Research presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons annual meeting reports that between 2002 and 2011, total hip replacement surgeries increased by approximately 90% in those aged 45-64. After controlling for other factors, the report concludes the increase is most likely due to the number of people who now fall within that age group.

    Mar 31, 2015 Read more
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