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Insidermedicine Daily News (Video)

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured ...

Insidermedicine is a daily health and medical video news service created by a leading physicians. Our content library contains videos in many languages including English, Chinese, Spanish, on over 100 different diseases. Joining the likes of the Associated Press and Reuters, Insidermedicine's newstories are featured by Google News and The News Room. April 25, 2007 Patients with HIV who are treated with protease inhibitors have an increased risk of heart attack, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Combination antiretroviral therapy has had a dramatic effect in reducing illness and death associated with the HIV virus, however an earlier study showed that the risk of heart attacks increased by 17% with every year a patient spent on antiretroviral. It isn’t known, though, whether all antiretroviral drugs carry this risk. The assessment of the role of any specific drug is difficult because patients with HIV usually receive a combination of drugs, and often switch regimens because of the availability of newer substances, adverse events, or drug regimen failure. Previous studies have shown a relationship between the use of protease inhibitors, a class of antiretroviral drug, and cardiovascular disease, but there is little information on the risks associated with another class of antiretroviral therapy called nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. In this study, more than 23,000 patients infected with the HIV virus were assessed to determine the incidence of heart attack and the association between heart attack and exposure to protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. Confirming the earlier results, the researchers found the risk of having a heart attack increased by 16% per year of exposure to protease inhibitors alone, which is equal to twice the risk over five years. Not such effect was observed with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors. It is thought that protease inhibitors raise the level of blood lipid, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart attack. Patients treated with protease inhibitors should have their cholesterol and blood pressure levels monitored, and take steps to reduce their lifestyle-related risk factors. This includes maintaining a healthy weight, eating a low-fat diet rich in fruits in vegetables, and getting regular exercise. Reporting for Insidermedicine, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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    Heart disease risk and air pollution

    (January 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From France - A position ...

    (January 1, 2015 - Insidermedicine) From France - A position paper written by experts from the European Society of Cardiology describes how air pollution is a important risk factor for heart disease. Published in the European Heart Journal, it calls for a decrease in fossil fuel usage, and also makes a number of recommendations for lifestyle modification for those with heart disease. Among these recommendations are that patients avoid areas of high automobile traffic, and consider home air filtration if living in areas with high air pollution. They also recommend trying to walk or cycle more, or exercise in parks, but only doing so away from major traffic areas.

    Jan 1, 2015 Read more
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    Malaria treatment from E.Coli

    (December 31, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Portugal - In areas ...

    (December 31, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Portugal - In areas where malaria is prevalent, only a fraction of those exposed go on to develop the disease. New research appearing in the journal Cell may help to explain why. Researchers have discovered that a strain of E.Coli in the human gut expresses a sugar on its cell surface, called alpha-gal, that is also expressed by the malaria parasite. By examining people in an area of Mali where malaria is present, researchers were able to confirm that the level of anti-alpha-gal antibodies in their blood correlated with their susceptibility to malaria. Furthermore, when mice were injected with synthetic alpha-gal molecules, their immune systems produced antibodies that are protective against mosquito borne malaria. More research is needed to determine if a similar approach could be applied to humans.

    Dec 31, 2014 Read more
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    HPV vaccine does not increase risky behavior in girls

    (December 30, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Ontario - The HPV ...

    (December 30, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Ontario - The HPV vaccine does not result in risker sexual activity in teenaged girls, according to a report published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Some groups have expressed concerns that the HPV vaccine may promote riskier behaviours among teenagers. Examining data on over 260,000 adolescent girls, researchers saw no increased risk of pregnancies, nor sexual transmitted infections (STI).

    Dec 30, 2014 Read more
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    Experimental prostate cancer treatment

    (December 29, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Washington - A new ...

    (December 29, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Washington - A new report published in PLOS One details an experimental compound which may help treat prostate and other cancers. Dubbed YK-4-279, this compound targets a genetic error, an ETS fusion, which is common to half of all prostate cancer cells. With the help of a mouse model of prostate cancer, the researchers found that the experimental compound suppressed the growth of the cancer, and also curbed its spread to the lungs.

    Dec 29, 2014 Read more
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    Rare genetic mutation for early heart attack

    (December 26, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Boston - A new ...

    (December 26, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Boston - A new report published in Nature finds a rare genetic mutation that raises risk of early heart attack. Researchers studied the exomes of nearly 10,000 people, half whom had an early heart attack and the other half who had not. Results showed that found that those with rare mutations in the APOA5 gene had higher triglycerides levels and a 2x increased risk of early heart attack

    Dec 26, 2014 Read more
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    Major complications following abortions are rare

    (December 25, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From San Francisco - A ...

    (December 25, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From San Francisco - A new report published in Obstetrics & Gynecology finds that major complications following abortion are rare. Researchers studied data on over 50,000 women who had undergone an abortion from 2009-2010. Researchers reviewed the 6 weeks after the procedure for any complications. They found that among these cases, there were only 126 major complications--or under a quarter of a percent. These numbers are similar to complications following a colonoscopy.

    Dec 25, 2014 Read more
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    Gene combinations linked to ALS

    (December 24, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From St Louis - A ...

    (December 24, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From St Louis - A new report published online in the Annals of Neurology, finds that many more cases of ALS may have a genetic origin than previously thought. Researchers examined DNA from over 390 people finding a number new mutations related to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Fifteen of the participants had two or more mutations in these genes linked to ALS. Certain single gene mutations have previously been established as causing ALS. But this new research strengthens the notion that having particular combinations of mutations may cause ALS as well. The researchers also found that the onset ALS can happen 10 years earlier in people that have two or more ALS linked gene mutations.

    Dec 24, 2014 Read more
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    Malaria undetectable 48 hours after new treatment

    (December 23, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Tennessee - A new ...

    (December 23, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Tennessee - A new compound had shown striking promise in the fight against malaria. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers administered the compound to a mouse model of malaria and after 48 hours the malaria was undetectable. The compound appears to disrupt a particular protein in the malaria organism. When disrupted this protein caused the red blood cells that were infected with the malaria parasite to undergo physical changes similar to an aging cell, causing the host’s immune system to destroy the it.

    Dec 23, 2014 Read more
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    Poor sleep quality associated with negative thinking

    (December 22, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From New York - A ...

    (December 22, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From New York - A new report published in the journal Cognitive Therapy and Research finds a link between sleep and negative thinking. Researchers asked 100 young adults about their sleeping habits and also perform two computerized tasks. They gauged the participants’ repetitive negative thinking (RNT), where a person is continually worrying or obsessing over the negative aspects of their life, their future, or their past experiences. The researchers found that those participants who slept for fewer hours, or who went to bed later experienced more RNT than those who kept a more regular sleep-wake schedule.

    Dec 22, 2014 Read more
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    High fitness level lowers risk of high blood pressure

    (December 17, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Detroit - According to ...

    (December 17, 2014 - Insidermedicine) From Detroit - According to research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, having a high fitness level lowers one's risk of high blood pressure. Researchers studied over 57,000 participants taking part in a long-term study, from 1991-2009. Results showed that those who had the highest fitness levels had a 20% lower risk of developing high blood pressure, when compared to those who had the lowest levels.

    Dec 18, 2014 Read more
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